Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Incensed



Incensed

Rev 8:3  And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer; and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne. 4  And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand. 5  And the angel took the censer, and filled it with fire of the altar, and cast it into the earth: and there were voices, and thunderings, and lightnings, and an earthquake.

Measly and pusillanimous, that is how I generally regard my prayer efforts. I don't pray enough, there is not enough passion in my prayers. Sometimes they don’t seem to resonate. They proceed more as cacophony than symphony. They are not thorough enough. So much to pray for, so few prayers offered up.

Encouraging though, what prayers I do pray, as a child of the Most High, are regarded by heaven as a sweet-smelling savor which engulf the throne.

With all that God has to do, the Almighty desires communication with me, one of His kids. Imagine that, I get to incense heaven with my petitions, praise and intercessions!

Thank you, dear Lord, for hearing and answering my prayers. Forgive my lack of communication with you. May the words of my lips and the meditations of my heart be acceptable unto you. All-knowing God, know that I love you supremely. I offer you my service today. Empower it with your Holy Spirit. Amen!

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

What's in a name?

Psa 68:4 Sing unto God, sing praises to his name: extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him.

"...his name JAH"

"Name" here speaks of God's individuality, authority, character. His very name tells of His renown.

Then we come to this curious demarcation of the Lord. We are used to the familiar usage of Lord, God and sometimes, occasionally, Jehovah. but here is a once and only usage of "JAH" as it stands alone. It is actually a contraction of Jehovah, but is used commonly as a suffix in many of the Bible names with which we are familiar. For examples; Eli(jah), "God of Jehovah"; Isa(iah), "JAH has saved"; Jerem(iah), "JAH will rise", etc.

The common usage of this suffix to Hebrew names indicates the centrality of God (JAH) in the lives of His people. He is integral to anything and everything.

In our culture, it seems as if God is an add-on. The phrase "God willing" is sometimes an afterthought rather than an all-important thought.

Our society hears the name of God used in blasphemy more than in praise and reverence.

What a crying shame that God's holy name is so misunderstood and misused. Would to JAH that we would pause, as the ancient scribes did, at the majesty of His name as it is presented, and make spiritual preparation before even invoking His holy and majestic name.

Let us consider that glorious name in whatever form we hear, say, read or otherwise engage it today. Names convey meaning, but true meaning is found only by the power of His name, JAH.